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Readers Respond: The Methods Used to Diagnose Your Type 1 Diabetes

Responses: 2

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Updated August 26, 2011

When you are diagnosed with type 1 you must have at least one definitive test to confirm the elevated blood sugar meets the criteria for diabetes. What test was used for your diagnosis? Was it confirmed with a second test? Were other tests performed (such as thyroid) to determine if there are any other autoimmune antibodies present?

Response to Ruthann

The A1C test showed your average blood sugar over the past three months - a normal reading would have been in the 5-6 range. Your reading indicated the onset of Type 2 diabetes and metformin is the common treatment. An A1C test is the appropriate diagnostic bloodwork, so rest assured your doctor knew what he/she was doing. The specialist should have explained to you that ketones can occur when your blood sugar is not lowered sufficiently by the medication. Ketones are the metabolic by-product of fat being broken down in the body for fuel. It's what dieters want but for diabetics it signals an extended period of high blood sugar. An increase in metformin dosage and/or readjustment in diet will usually correct the problem. Checking your blood sugar daily will let you know if you are in the targeted range. It sounds as if you are getting the correct treatment and standard of care for Type 2 diabetes, as long as you are doing your part and checking your blood sugar regularly.
—Guest Jane

Ruthanne

I am 67 yrs of age, a female,149lbs in january 2011 my primary care did an A1c which was 9.5, a first for me, and gave me metformin 500...went to see specialist May 26... she saw minimal ketone and that was her diagnoses plain and simple I am confused...some advice would be helpful.
—Guest Ruthanne Bright

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